Human power quad copters

Non-human powered quad copter

Just found this cool video on Vimeo about a university project that is making quad copters. The special thing about them is that they are powered by humans! A person is working his ass off, producing roughly 0.7 horse powers to get liftoff with a 36 kg structure and himself airborne. Interesting stuff!


While waiting

The new iPhone case (Photo: society6)

Still waiting for the new phone. Yesterday I took measures to get the darn phone protected by buying an iPhone case. I ended up buying a case, which is really protective, but I’m starting to think I should’ve bought skins instead (adhesive material of thin silicone).

Since it’s still more than three weeks until I get my phone, I’ll have plenty of time to change my mind.

Waiting for my new phone

Waiting for my iPhone 5 (Photo: Apple)

The iPhone 5 got released for orders in Norway today, and as planned (in secrecy’ish), I ordered myself a version. I’m going black, all in! All in is ~64 GB these days.

Looking forward to it! (and I’ll continue to look forward to it the next 3-4 weeks, when it arrives)

PS. Totally unrelated: I did a crazy choice and used a non-capitalized title. Will it float?


I though I should write a short post on my latest “technology project”. I needed an easy-to-access backup storage for images, my iTunes music collection and so forth, so I decided to buy myself a NAS.

The choice fell on NetGear’s ReadyNAS NV+, a four-bay NAS. The price is not too intimidating, roughly 2k NOK (excluding the harddisks, which are not included). I also bought two Seagate Barracuda Green 2TB discs. The ReadyNAS runs NetGear’s proprietary XRAID, which allows hotswapping of discs in case one breaks down. With two discs, the total capacity is currently 2TB. This post is however not about configuring the ReadyNAS. Configuration is very easy – the Wizard mode of the ReadyNAS was brilliant.

There is however two downsides with the original ReadyNAS NV+. First, it only comes with 256MB RAM. You notice its lack of RAM when you access the control panel (via your browser), and you are e.g. transferring files to the NAS. Second, the standard fan that comes with the ReadyNAS NV+ is outrageously noisy, and unbearable if you’re planning to keep the NAS in a room where people spend time.

The solution is obvious: Replace the original parts. Here’s what’s going into the ReadyNAS:

  • RAM: Crucial DDR SO-DIMM PC3200 1GB CL3
  • FAN: SilenX 92mm iXtrema PRO IXP-64-11, 11dB(A)

Replacing the RAM:
This is very easy. First, unscrew four screws on the back, two on each side and slide the side panels off the ReadyNAS. This reveals four more screws on the top side. Unscrew these and you will see the RAM module. Pull the clips on the RAM module aside and the module “pops up” to a 30 degree angle, ready to be removed. The new module is inserted all the way in, until the clips fit into the module’s tracks.

Replacing the fan:
On the backside of the ReadyNAS, four screws will allow you to pull out the metal frame holding the fan. Unscrew the four screws and pull the metal frame out. Remove the fan cable. Now unscrew the four bigger screws, holding the fan to the metal frame. Replace the frame with the new one (remember to put the fan in the right way). Reverse the process and fasten the fan’s metal frame back into the ReadyNAS. Fasten the top panel (four screws) before fastening the side panels (2×2 screws).

After these simple updates, the ReadyNAS NV+ is more responsive and very quiet! The operation temperature has increased with a few degrees (roughly 40-45 degrees when stressing the device), but the noise level has decreased to levels below city background noise. The total cost of this update was roughly 500NOK and it definitely moved the NAS to the next level with respect to responsiveness and the famous “just work without being noticed” criteria.